Gastrogard Syringes x7 (7 syringes)

Gastrogard Syringes x7 (7 syringes)
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93% or racehorses in training and up to 70% of other sports horses suffer from gastric ulcers at some time in their career! Symptoms include: Recurrant colic or abdominal pain Fussy eating Cribbing Poor coat Change in temperment (for the worse) Poor performance For treatment and prevention of... Read more
Gastrogard Syringes x7 (7 syringes)

93% or racehorses in training and up to 70% of other sports horses suffer from gastric ulcers at some time in their career!

Symptoms include:
Recurrant colic or abdominal pain
Fussy eating
Cribbing
Poor coat
Change in temperment (for the worse)
Poor performance

For treatment and prevention of gastric ulcers in horses, including foals from 4 weeks old.

 

* Sometimes we may not have enough stock so dispatch will be the following working day from your order. Of course this all depends on your prescription being sent promptly!

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Visit www.myvetmeds.co.uk / equine / digestion-equine / gastrogard-syringe.htm

Qty Unit Price Savings points
1 £154.70 - 155
4+ £153.88 0.5% 616+

Product Description

About Gastrogard Syringes x7 (7 syringes)

Gastrogard Syringes x7 (7 syringes)

93% or racehorses in training and up to 70% of other sports horses suffer from gastric ulcers at some time in their career!

Symptoms include:
Recurrant colic or abdominal pain
Fussy eating
Cribbing
Poor coat
Change in temperment (for the worse)
Poor performance

For treatment and prevention of gastric ulcers in horses, including foals from 4 weeks old.

 

* Sometimes we may not have enough stock so dispatch will be the following working day from your order. Of course this all depends on your prescription being sent promptly!

++gg++

Please note: images are for illustration purposes only and pack sizes/strengths and new packaging styles may not be reflected in the image shown.

Directions For Use

Directions for Use

GASTROGARD is effective in horses of various breeds and under different management conditions, foals as young as four weeks of age and weighing over 70 kg, and breeding stallions. For oral administration.
Treatment of gastric ulcers: one administration per day during 28 consecutive days at the dose rate of 4 mg omeprazole per kg body weight followed immediately by a dosage regimen of one administration per day during 28 consecutive days at the dose rate of 1 mg omeprazole per kg body weight, to reduce the recurrence of gastric ulcers during treatment.
Should recurrence occur (confirmed by gastroscopy), re-treatment at a dose rate of 4 mg omeprazole per kg body weight is recommended.
Prevention of gastric ulcers: one administration per day at the dose rate of 1mg omeprazole per kg body weight.
To deliver GASTROGARD at the treatment dose of 4 mg omeprazole/kg, set the syringe plunger to the appropriate dose division for the horse?s weight. Each full dose division on the syringe plunger delivers sufficient omeprazole to treat 100 kg bodyweight. The contents of one syringe will treat a 575 kg horse at the rate of 4 mg omeprazole per kg body weight.
To deliver GASTROGARD at the dose of 1 mg omeprazole/kg, set the syringe plunger to the dose division equivalent to one quarter of the horse's body weight. At this dose, each full division on the syringe plunger will deliver sufficient omeprazole to treat 400 kg body weight. For example, to treat a horse weighing 400kg set the plunger to 100kg.
Replace cap after use.

Active Ingredient

Gastrogard Syringes x7 (7 syringes) ingredients

Each syringe of GASTROGARD, containing 6.16 g of oral paste, delivers omeprazole 2.279 g (37% w/w paste). Also contains yellow iron oxide (E172).

Side Effects

Side effects of Gastrogard Syringes x7 (7 syringes)

For animal treatment only.
Not recommended for animals under 4 weeks old or weighing less than 70 kg bodyweight.
Pregnancy and lactation: Laboratory studies in rats and rabbits have not produced any evidence of a teratogenic effect. In the absence of data during pregnancy and lactation, the use of GASTROGARD in pregnant and lactating mares is not recommended.
Interactions: Omeprazole may delay the elimination of warfarin. No other interaction with medicines routinely used in the treatment of horses is expected, although interaction with drugs metabolised by liver enzymes cannot be excluded.
Overdose: No undesirable effects related to treatment were observed following daily use for 91 days at omeprazole dosages up to 20 mg/kg in adult horses and in foals older than 2 months. No undesirable effects (including on the semen quality or reproductive behaviour) related to treatment were observed following daily use for 71 days at an omeprazole dosage of 12 mg/kg in breeding stallions. No undesirable effects related to treatment were observed following daily use for 21 days at an omeprazole dosage of 40 mg/kg in adult horses.

Additional Data

Gastrogard Syringes x7 (7 syringes) specification

Specification: Detail:
Pack Size: 7 syringes
Brands: Merial Animal Health
Product Form: paste
External Link:

http://www.noahcompendium.co.uk/Merial_Animal_Health_Ltd/documents/S3817.html

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Q & A

Q. I have had my mare for 3 1/2 years half of that time she has been off due to gastro problems.
She would show very mild colic and on every occasion i got the vet out she gave her a pain killer and anti spasmotic and she seemed to pick up. However this last time her belly has swollen so much i had to get the vets to check she was not pregnant, she was in alot of pain but hasnt shown definate symtoms for colic or ulcers.
I was recommended by someone to put her on a gavascon and yacult to help the problem, the pain seem to have settled down but the swollen belly is still there.,
The signs she shows when she takes a turn is:
Swollen belly
Yawning
Tucking in and holding her belly in for a long time
She has had a high white blood cell count and protein levels.
Abnormal heart beat
Generally not herself but still eating normally

With the supplements she ison now the pain seems to be managable but she still has a very swollen belly. She will just tolerate a rug getting put on and doing the girth up she gets very aggressive so she is fully off work now. She is on a high fibre diet atm.
What is your opnions on this matter?
Its just seems to be very vague with the symtoms she has from what information i can find on ulcers she doesnt seem to show the normal signs of ulcers.

Thanks
Gemma
A.

With such vague but consistent signs of abdominal discomfort and altered eating patterns, its difficult not to think that there may be an ulcer problem involved!
I think the only way you're going to get to the bottom of it is going to be to scope her, and have a look at her stomach lining - not all vets have a 3m gastroscope, so your vet may need to refer you to a specialist who can do it. Once they're had a look at her stomach lining, it should be possible to rule in or out ulcers.
Hope that helps,

David Harris BVSc MRCVS
MyVetMeds

Q. my horse doesnt like his saddle put on or girthing up. His back and saddle have been checked by experts and are fine. He is also sucking back from the leg when ridden and his behaviour has changed for the worst. he has reared whilst being led down to the field, stopping and going backwards, then threatening to rear whilst out hacking. He used to be so willing and well behaved.Could this behaviour be the result of an ulcer or anything else? Thankyou.
A.

Yes, this would be consistent with stomach ulcers, although there are other possibilities. My advice would be to discuss it with your vet, who will be able to advise you more fully than I can!

David Harris BVSc MRCVS
MyVetMeds

Q. My 18yr old horse has always been sensitive about having his girth done up and will step backwards but now he has taken exception to it by moving back quickly reluctant to leave the stable, although the girth is very loose and recently behaved like a young horse who had not been girth before, jumping up and down and bucking he shows no other symptoms, eats well looks healthy - he is out all day just in at nights is fed Dobson and H Pasture mix with Alfa A. Would be grateful for your opinion.
A.

Hi - immediate response would be to check the saddle and girth area of the horse's back to check for sores or bruising. If there is nothing obvious then you need to get your vet to check your horse over as it would be danferous to try and ride him.
Good luck
Philip Davies BVSc MRCVS

Q. Our horse has been diagnosed with stomach ulcers,how long will he need to be on the treat ment ? Can he trian whilst be treated ? Is it advisable to keep him on gastrogard him.
Thank you
Philip
A.

Stomach ulcers in horses usually need a course of 2-6 weeks of Gastrogard to treat them - exactly how long depends on the horse, and the severity of the ulcers.
Many vets will taiper off the treatment over the last week or so, to reduce the risk of "rebound acidity".
While being treated, it is advisable to minimise all stress - generally, this would mean coming out of training, but it depends on the severity of the ulcers, and the exact training regime he's on. My advice would be to discuss it with your vet, as it may be he can be reduced to a lower stress regime, without completely losing fitness.
Long term, it isn't usually necessary to keep a horse on Gastrogard for life (although there are exceptions); however, some horses need very long (3-4 month) courses to completely resolve the ulcers, and some horses will need occasional "top up" doses at stressful times even after the ulcers have healed. That said, the majority of ulcer problems can be resolved with a single course of Gastrogard to fix the ulcers, and minor changes in management or training to reduce the risk of recurrence.

Hope that helps!

David Harris BVSc MRCVS
MyVetMeds

Q. We have a 5 year old gelding. When he's being riden/excerise, he will get the runs(diarrehea) loose stool next day or 2 days later. He has a good appitete. Please advise
A.

It sounds like a stress response of some sort; although I wouldn't rule out gastric ulcers, I would strongly suggest you get your vet involved for a diarrhoea workup, including bloods and faeces samples.
It may be that a course of probiotics, e.g. Protexin Pro-Soothe, might be enough just to settle his intestines. However, if that doesn't work, you'll definitely have to do some more tests to rule out anything nasty.

Hope that helps,

David Harris BVSc MRCVS
MyVetMeds

Q. I am told by another owner whose horse is on this medication that water should be limited whilst the horse is on this treatment. If this is the case, does it not contradict treatment for those horses prone to colic.
A.

As far as I'm aware, that isn't usually necessary - the drug should work perfectly well in a well-hydrated horse! There may be other reasons for witholding water, but there's no special indication to do so when treating ulcers that I know of; especially as it can be dangerous in its own right.
If in doubt, I suggest you discuss it with your vet, who will know the full clinical history of your horse, and any management strategies being used.

David Harris BVSc MRCVS
MyVetMeds

Q. What is the current withdrawal period for this product and please confirm how many syringes would be required for the full treatment of one horse?
A.

According to the EHSLC, the detection time for Omeprazole is approximately 72 hours. Note that this is NOT a witholding time - the withold time is calculated by the prescribing veterinary surgeon using the detection time and his/her clinical judgement of the horse. This is because some horses will metabolise some drugs faster than others, so it is the vets responsibility to determine how long a drug should be witheld for before competing or racing.

An "average" horse of 450 kg would usually need between 3 and 4 boxes of Gastrogard (21-28 syringes) for the full 28 day course, depending on the severity of the ulcers and the speed of the response; however, it may be necessary to use a longer course in more severely affected horses.

I hope that helps,

David Harris BVSc MRCVS
MyVetMeds

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