Fuciderm Gel (30g)

Fuciderm Gel (30g)
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Fuciderm gel is used for the topical treatment of certain skin diseases such as wet eczema (acute moist dermatitis) which can occur in isolated patches on the body or in skin folds.Wet eczema is often made worse by the dog scratching or licking the affected area because of itching or pain.The skin problem... Read more
Fuciderm Gel (30g)

Fuciderm gel is used for the topical treatment of certain skin diseases such as wet eczema (acute moist dermatitis) which can occur in isolated patches on the body or in skin folds.

Wet eczema is often made worse by the dog scratching or licking the affected area because of itching or pain.

The skin problem may be associated with flea allergy and your veterinary surgeon may treat your dog for fleas at the same time.

Fuciderm gel contains a well known antibiotic which helps kill the bacteria and a corticosteroid anti-inflammatory which will help relieve the itching and inflammation.

Visit www.myvetmeds.co.uk / dog / coat-skin-dog / fuciderm-gel.htm

Product Description

About Fuciderm Gel (30g)

Fuciderm Gel (30g)

Fuciderm gel is used for the topical treatment of certain skin diseases such as wet eczema (acute moist dermatitis) which can occur in isolated patches on the body or in skin folds.

Wet eczema is often made worse by the dog scratching or licking the affected area because of itching or pain.

The skin problem may be associated with flea allergy and your veterinary surgeon may treat your dog for fleas at the same time.

Fuciderm gel contains a well known antibiotic which helps kill the bacteria and a corticosteroid anti-inflammatory which will help relieve the itching and inflammation.

Please note: images are for illustration purposes only and pack sizes/strengths and new packaging styles may not be reflected in the image shown.

Directions For Use

Directions for Use

If necessary, clean the infected area of any pus or other material before applying the gel. Use cotton wool dampened with water. Dry before applying the gel.

Squeeze a little of the gel onto the affected area of the skin and spread it gently twice daily.

If you forget to use the gel at any time, use it as soon as you remember. Then go on as before. Complete the normal course as prescribed by your veterinary surgeon which is usually for 5 to a maximum of 7 days.

Advice on correct administration: Follow your veterinary surgeon's instructions about when and how to use the gel. Read the label carefully. Use the gel as your veterinary surgeon has told you.

Avoid getting the gel into your own or your dog's eyes, since it may cause stinging. If it gets into eyes bathe with water.

Wash your hands well after applying the gel.

After a few days of using the gel, the dog's skin condition should start to improve. However, if the problem gets worse or doesn't improve, or if there are any other unexpected problems, consult your veterinary surgeon.

Active Ingredient

Fuciderm Gel (30g) ingredients

Fuciderm gel is a white translucent gel containing fusidic acid 0.5 % w/w and betamethasone 0.1 % w/w (as the valerate ester) with methyl parahydroxybenzoate and propyl parahydroxybenzoate as preservatives.

Side Effects

Side effects of Fuciderm Gel (30g)

As with other topical antibiotic/corticosteroid combinations for treating skin ailments, the gel should not be used if your dog is allergic to the ingredients.

Do not use on skin conditions other than those for which your veterinary surgeon has prescribed Fuciderm gel.

The use of the gel over large surface areas and prolonged treatment should be avoided.

Do not apply to the eye.

Adverse reactions: Anti-inflammatory corticosteroids, such as betamethasone valerate, are known to exert a wide range of side effects. Whilst single high doses are generally well tolerated, they may induce severe side effects in long term use and when esters possessing a long duration of action are administered. Dosage in medium to long term use should therefore generally be kept to the minimum necessary to control symptoms.

Steroids themselves, during treatment, may cause Cushingoid symptoms involving significant alteration of fat, carbohydrate, protein and mineral metabolism, e.g. redistribution of body fat, muscle weakness and wastage, and osteoporosis may result.

During therapy, effective doses suppress the hypothalamo-pituitreal-adrenal axis.

Following cessation of treatment, symptoms of adrenal insufficiency can arise and this may render the animal unable to deal adequately with stressful situations.

Locally applied steroids may cause thinning of the skin.

Corticosteroids may delay wound healing and the immunosuppressant action may weaken resistance to or exacerbate existing infections. In the presence of viral infections, steroids may worsen or hasten the progress of the disease.

Gastrointestinal ulceration has been reported in animals treated with corticosteroids, and gastrointestinal ulceration may be exacerbated by steroids in patients given non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and in animals with spinal cord trauma.

Steroids may cause enlargement of the liver (hepatomegaly) with increased serum hepatic enzymes.

If you notice any serious effects or other effects not mentioned in the data sheet, please inform your veterinary surgeon.

Special warnings: For animal treatment only.

For external use only.

Precautions when used on the dog: The dog should be prevented from licking the affected area. It may be helpful to apply the gel immediately before feeding, or before taking the dog for a walk, in order to distract the dog's attention.

Where there is a risk of the dog scratching or chewing the affected area, preventative measures such as the use of an Elizabethan collar should be considered.

Remember, this treatment is for your dog only. Should the skin condition occur again at a later date, do not use the gel without consulting your veterinary surgeon. Do not use it on other dogs.

Special precautions to be taken by the person administering Fuciderm gel to the dog: When applying the gel, please remember that corticosteroids may produce irreversible effects in the skin; they can be absorbed and may have harmful effects, especially with frequent and extensive contact or in pregnancy. Always wear single-use disposable gloves when applying this product to animals. Wash hands after use.

Use during pregnancy and lactation: Do not use on a pregnant bitch, or if you suspect she is pregnant.

Additional Data

Fuciderm Gel (30g) specification

Specification: Detail:
Pack Size: 30g
Brands: Vetxx
Product Form: gel
External Link: http://www.noahcompendium.co.uk/Dechra_Veterinary_Products/documents/S5462.html

Reviews

How people have rated this so far

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  • 5 100%

fantastic cream
jane on 25th September 2013
* * * * *

My collie was prescribed this when she got wet eczema after an operation bless her,
It was quite bad and after only a few applications the eczema had all cleared up, amazing stuff :-)

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Q & A

Q. My dog is a rescue from romania and had terrible mange when first rescued, this has left various dry patches that irritate my dog. The rescue centre gave me a tube of fuciderm gel as he had made the area under his chin and near his jaw line sore. Everytime it seems to be healing he manages to scratch it again, I cant you an elisabethan collar as the sore is right where the collar sits and rubs the sore area, can you give me any other suggestions on what will help. I have resorted to putting a sock on the offending paw, that he scratches with. This has helped a little. Please any advise will help, wether it be a natural reedy or somthing else. I dont want to use to much fuciderm gel as I dont know if this will hurt him in the long run. He is seven years old as was yerribly nistreated before i had him.
A.

I'm afraid to say it sounds like it might be a bit more serious than just a patch of dry skin; has your vet completely ruled out skin parasites and infection? Or any other underlying disease? I think that's what needs to be done - rather than just putting lotions and salves on it, you and your vet need to get to the bottom of the situation.

David Harris BVSc MRCVS
MyVetMeds

Q. My indoor cat has become so obsessed with cleaning she has licked the back of two front legs and half her underbelly bald. Can I try fuciderm on this to try and alleviate her itching ?
A.

It may help, but remember, it is a criminal offence to obtain or use a prescription medicine without a prescription from your vet.
There are a number of potential problems that can cause overgrooming like you describe, and for most of them, the cream would mask the symptoms, but not treat the underlying cause!
My advice would be for you to contact your vets and discuss her condition with them, because it may be that there is a more serious condition than a simple skin reaction.

David Harris BVSc MRCVS
MyVetMeds

Q. Hi There

What happens if my dog has managed to chew the Fuciderm tube, my dog has managed to get the tube from the side board and whilst most of the contents appear to be in her bed, it does look like she had managed to chew some of the tube.

Any comments would be appreciated
A.

Although the antibiotic (fucidic acid) in Fuciderm is unlikely to be harmful if eaten, it also contains a steroid component; I therefore strongly suggest you contact your vet as soon as possible and discuss it with them - without knowing the size and breed of the dog or his medical history, I'm afraid I can't give you any more detailed advice.

David Harris BVSc MRCVS

MyVetMeds Dispensing Vet

Q. My Jack Russell has scratched the inside of her ear (the flap until it has bled. I'm using canaural to treat the infection but can I use fucidern on the tender outer skin?
A.

In principle, yes - however, as they're both antibiotics, and Fuciderm is a prescription-only medicine, you'll need to discuss its use with your vet (who knows your dog) first.

David Harris BVSc MRCVS
MyVetMeds

Q. What can happen if a little dog licks a little bit of fuciderm on its skin only once?
A.

Hi Marc,

If its only a very small amount, it isn't likely that it will do much harm; however, you should watch out for signs of a stomach ache or digestive upset, as these are the most likely side effects (there's a small risk of stomach ulcers, and a somewhat larger risk of antibiotic-induced gastroenteritis). If either of these or any other unusual symptom occurs, contact your vet and tell them that a small amount of Fuciderm has been eaten.

I hope this helps,

David Harris BVSc MRCVS
MyVetMeds

Q. is there anything that can be used instead of fuciderm gel that doent need a prescription
thanks pete
A.

If you are treating a skin infection using the Fuciderm for its antiseptic properties then it is probably the best available product.

Other suggestions might be an antispetic wash using Savlon or equivalent, or even good old fashioned Calamine lotion if the coat isnt present, or even a collar to restrict access to the skin by licking. Cant be more helpful as you dont say where the problem is.

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